CAMP UPTON

Longwood's Journey


Camp Upton was built in 1917 as an induction and training facility for new soldiers who were to fight in World War I. The camp was named after Major General Emory Upton, a Union general in the Civil War.

Between World Wars I and II, the camp was used by members of the Civilian Conservation Corps. Many of the trees on the site were planted by these men. The camp was reopened in 1940, on the eve of World War II, serving its original purpose as a military training ground.

In 1944, Camp Upton was used as a hospital to treat wounded veterans of the war.It also served as a Prisoner of War Camp, when in May of 1945, 500 German prisoners were sent to Camp Upton.

In 1947, the camp was replaced by Brookhaven National Laboratory, to conduct scientific research. The lab remains in operation to this day with funding from the Department of Energy.


We are now working on collecting and creating an online archive of letters, diaries, pictures and stories from members of the 77th Division. Our hope is to create an online resource of primary material to aid researchers. The information will be placed by Regiment and Company with the Regimental histories listed below. If you have any information that you would be willing to share, please
contact us.
pinfranco@aol.com or vmassian@optonline.net


Camp Upton in WWI by Thomas Bayles

New York Times News Articles About Camp Upton

The Camp Upton Story (1917-1921) by Norval Dwyer

Camp Upton (from a pamphlet published by the Public Affairs Office of Brookhaven National Laboratory)

The Lost Battalion Archives

Camp Upton Described and Photographed
by, Roger Batchelder, 1918

Chronological History of the 77th Division

77th Division- Record of Events

Map Archives

Trench and Camp - The Camp Upton Newspaper

The Victorious 77th- Heroes of the Argonne Forest
by, 1st Lieut. Arthur McKeough

History of the Seventy Seventh Division

Units belonging to the 77th Division

Infantry

History of the 305th Infantry
by, Frank Tiebout

History of the 306th Infantry
by, Julius Ochs Adler

History of the 307th Infantry
by, W. Kerr Rainsford

History of the 308 Infantry
L. Wardlaw Miles

Our Sons at War, Co. A. 308th Infantry
by, Lee McMollum- 1940

Medical

The 308th Medical Detachment
by, William D. Conklin

308th Ambulance Company-302d Sanitary Train

Machine Gun Battalions

A Story of the 305th Machine Gun Battalion
by, Henry W. Smith

The 306th Machine Gun Battalion
This Man's War- by Charles F. Minder

Memories of the 306th Machine Gun Battalion
Company B
by, Talbot Brewer


Artillery

History of the 304th Field Artillery
by, James M. Howard

History of the 305th Field Artillery

History of the 306th Field Artillery

The 302nd Engineers

The 302nd Trench Artillery

The 302nd Ammunition Train -
The letters of Laurance Bucknam

Oh! How He Hated To Get Up In The Morning
Irving Berlin at Camp Upton

The C.C.C. at Camp Upton

Longwood during World War 1

Postcards from Camp Upton

Lost Battalion Website

German POWs kept at Camp Upton

Videos of the 77th Division during the Meuse - Argonne Offensive Sept., 26th - Nov.11th, 1918

On September 7, 2008 the 77th Division was retire from active duty. The following video is of the casing of the colors at the former site of Camp Upton

 

Video # 1 - Members of the Lost Battalion marching eastward down the Charlevaux Ravine out of the 'Pocket' the morning of Oct. 18, 1918 - The Lost Battalion taking roll just prior to the official picture being snapped Oct. 8, 1918 - major Charles Whittlesey, 308th Inf. and Major J.F. McKinney, 307th Inf. talking after the rescue of the Lost Battalion by McKinney's men - General Alexander 77th Division - General Lenihan, 77th Division - French woman and boy pump water for a 77th Division Doughboy

Video # 2  A 77th Division first aid station set up in a captured German bunker. - officers and men examine a blasted German dugout. - A patrol passes a dead German soldier in the Argonne forest. - German prisoners being transported from Chatel Chehery under 77th Division MP's. - 308th Infantry and 302nd Trench Mortar personnel advance on a German position in the Argonne.

Video # 3 - Supply Trains of the 305th M.G. Battalion, 306th Infantry and 302nd engineers, along with French artillery passing through Chateau Thierry.

Video # 4 - The 306th Field Artillery passing through burning Buzancy - 306th Field Artillery guns firing from hidden positions near Abri du Crochet - 308th M.G.

 

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