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Review of C.C.C. is reduced by State Dept.


REVIEW OF C.C.C.
WORK is REDUCED
By STATE DEPT.
Middle Island Mail
January 15, 1936


Review of C.C.C. Work Is Reduced By State Dept.

Remaining Unit to continue Work Started in 1934

Construction of Water Holes, Truck Trails and Tree Planting on Program- Commissioner Praises Men

The removal and abandonment of one of the C.C.C. camps at Yaphank, Camp Upton, leaving only one of the original four which opened there in May, 1934, is the subject of a bulletin from the State Conservation department. "The abandonment of the three camps, one January 1 and two several months ago, has been due entirely to the new policy announced by Washington to the effect that the total enrollments for the forest workers throughout the country would be about 400,000 for the next period, instead of 600,000 which was the total for the last work period." says this bulletin, "As a result of this policy of retrenchment New York state has been obliged to close 15 camps.

The camp remaining at Camp Upton, it is explained, will continue on a modified scale the improvement work, which was started there by the four camps. The work schedule calls for construction of four water holes to aid in forest fire fighting; the building of 27 miles of truck trails, and tree planting on about 70 acres of ground.

Approximately 1,100 acres of forested land will be improved and 22 miles of firebreaks will be constructed. A survey of the land will take the men over 51 miles of territory and a rodent control program will cover 1,728 acres on the old government reservation. The remainder of the program calls for general cleanup work on 171 acres and planting of grain on 193 acres. In addition the enrollees will maintain the fire lines, feed strips and truck trails previously constructed.

Much of the work originally proposed has been completed, while some of the other work had only been started when the Conservation department had to abandon the camps. The work was begun two years ago to develop a forest demonstration area and also a model game management area. When the four camps were established it was proposed to construct 11 water holes and 53 miles of truck trails. To date 2 water holes have been constructed and 26 miles of truck trails built.

Trees were to be planted on 1,276 acres and to date 1,206 acres have been covered. Forest stand improvement work was to cover 1,624 acres and up to 559 acres have been covered. It also was planned to collect about 400 bushels and coniferous tree seed and 9,126 pounds of hardwood seeds. The records show that 485 bushels of the conifers were collected and 9,126 of hardwood seeds.

Fifty-six miles of fire breaks have been constructed out of a proposed total of 78 miles and to date 3,377 acres. The C. C. C. boys and men planted grain on 711 acres. The original schedule called for 904 acres of planting.

Lake and pond development work called for 1,454 man day's work and this program was completed. The men completed seven experimental plots, the original number scheduled. The rodent control program called for work in 1,728 acres and to date the men have covered over 1,000 acres. The lineal survey of the property was to bring them over 167 miles of ground and to date they have covered 116 miles. A plan for the removal of fire hazards on 20 acres of ground was completed and construction of 2.7 miles of telephone line also was completed as was a topographical survey covering 7,000 acres.

Because the nature of the tree growths on Long Island, fires are frequent in the spring and fall. The C. C. C. workers at Yaphank did their share of forest fire fighting, as the record shows 3,640 man days spent on this unscheduled but very necessary job.

Retyped by Michael Giannattasio
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