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April 15, 1919

April 15, 1919

April 15, Vol. 2, No. 28

 

Camp Commander Awarded D. S. C.

            Not A man or officer in camp who didn't register personal satisfaction when the announcement was made last week that the camp commander, Brigadier General William J Nicholson, had been awarded the Distinguished Service Cross. The telegram from Washington announcing the award came just after the General had left for Washington and he was uninformed of it until he reached the Capital.

            General Nicholson led the 157th Infantry brigade in France. The capture of Montfaucon was one of the operations of the brigade which won commendation for its soldierness. The General has been commander here ever since his return from overseas in December. He has a long and distinguished record as a soldier, having served the army for forty-three years. He was commissioned by general grants and for a time was Colonel of the Seventh cavalry, One of the most famous of the regular army units. He joined the Seventh, Custer’s old regiment, in the field shortly after the Custer massacre. General Nicholson had wid experience as an Indian fighter. Regular army officers say that his experience with enlisted men is probably wider than that of any living army officer.

 

 

No Plans Yet For Camp’s Permanency

            Although it was announced some days ago from Washington that Upton was among the camps to be made permanent posts, no word has come from camp headquarters as to plans for developing and improving, although it is reasonably sure processes will be begun before long leading to permanency. The plans will be announced from the commanding general's office when perfected.

            The recent announcement was that the War Department has decided to purchase the site of the Upton camp, and was made by Acting Secretary of War Benedict Crowell. The advantages of all the National Army  and National Guards were investigated. In the eastern department, camps Mills and Dix will be retained in addition to Upton. Camp Merritt will be abandoned. The government will pay for damages to the land and permanent buildings there.

 

 

CAFETERIAS BUSY

            There was a never ending line of officers at the Officers’ House during this day of the Twenty-seventh Division in Camp. The restaurant there did a record business. The mess line for breakfast formed at 8 o'clock and food was served continuously until 11 at night. Brigadier generals rubbed shoulders with lieutenants in the line.

            The Hostess House and Visitors’ House were similarly congested with enlisted men.

 

THE PORT OF MISSING MEN

            With this issue, Trench and Camp begins the weekly publication of The Port of Missing Men. In it are the names of men whose relatives are anxious to secure some word of them. Every reader of Trench and Camp owes it to his buddies to read through The Port of Missing Men each week, and if there is any information available about any man, communicate with The Port of Missing Men, Trench and Camp, Camp Upton, or with the relative whose name appears.

            Here is a sample of the letters received from loved ones torn with anxiety for soldier brother, son or sweetheart from whom no word has been received:

“To the Editors of Trench and Camp,

            “Dear Sirs: Will you kindly try to locate my brother through your ‘Port of Missing Men.’ He was reported missing in action October 4, Samuel Holmes Bedell, Company L. 18th Infantry, 4th squad of 1st platoon under Lieut. Roe. Thanking you kindly, I am

                                                “CATHERINE BEDELL”

91a Somers Street,

Brooklyn, New York.

 

 

THIS WEEK’S LIST

            Samuel Holmes Bedell, Co. L. 18th Inf.,4th squad of the 1st platoon under Lieut. Roe. Reported missing in action October 4th.  Communicate with Catherine Bedell, 91a Somers St., Brooklyn, New York.

            Private Harry J. Campbell, Co. C, 147th Inf., 37th div. Serial number 1746807. Has not been heard from since September. Communicate with Mrs. Margaret A. Campbell, 29 Essex St., New York.

            Thomas F. Ford, Battery F, 336th Field Artillery, 87th Division. Went overseas in July and has not been heard from him cents. Communicate with his anxious mother, Mrs. M. A. Ford, 5 Linden Street, Newark, N. J.

            Private William Goadby, Battery B, 108th Field Artillery. Has not been heard from since last April, when he left camp Hancock for overseas. Communicate with Mrs. Mollie Corkran, 6100 Market St., West Philadelphia, PA.

            Corporal Edward Gallagher, 4th Reg. Inf. Headquarters Co., 3rd Division. Reporting missing October 12, was known to have been alive on October 15th, but has not been with his regiment since that date. The regiment was at Monfalcon, 1 mile north of Verdun. Write to Mrs. John M. Gallagher, Wayne, PA

            Pvt. John Hayes, Co. C, 5th Ammunition Train— later transferred to Co. A, Military Police, 5th Division, A. E. F. Has not been heard from since March 18, 1918. Information requested by his cousin, Mrs. Jay Clark, 92 Jefferson St., Newark, NJ

            Wagoneer Aloysius B. Anderson, Supply Co., 18th Field Artillery, A. E. F. Has not been heard from for several months. Was gassed in October and taken to a hospital, but since then nothing has been heard of him. Inquiry from his sister, Mrs. Jennie Rocher, 118 N. Wildy Street, Philadelphia, PA.

            Sgt. Joseph Ingram, Battery A, 350th Field Artillery. Was last heard from in November, 1918. In December a friend wrote that Sergeant Ingram was in the hospital. Communicate with his mother, Mrs. Hannah Ingram, 80 Green St., Newark, NJ

            Sgt. William H Montgomery, 11th Company, Third Air Service Mechanics, A. E. F. No letter since November, 1918. Inquiry from Miss Ethel Gronce, 116 Ninth Ave. Newark N. J.

            Pvt. Frank Kowalski, Co. B, 18th Infantry. Was wounded in July and again in September, 1918. Has not been heard from him in over seven months. His mother, Mrs. Anna Kowalski, of 145 Sherman Ave., Trenton, NJ requests information concerning him.

            Pvt. John J. Cameron, Co. F, 163rd Infantry. Last address given was A. E. F., France, A. P. O. 727. Inquiry from Mr. Charles P McDonough, R. F. D., No. 5, Fair View Park, Trenton, N. J.

            Corp. Harold Weeden, Co. D, 113th Infantry, 29th Division. Miss Mabel Brady, 321 18th Avenue, Newark, N. J., would welcome information concerning Corp. Weeden, who has not written in six months.

            William Corcoran, Co. D, 304th Infantry, later transferred to Co. G, 58th infantry. Has not been heard from since July 4, 1918. Communicate with Mrs. Charles Kelley, 1720 Johnston St., Philadelphia, PA

            Miss Anna Kate's, 135 Lamberton Street, Trenton, N. J., inquires for two soldier friends: Pvt. Merle A. Varney, Hdqts. Horse Battalion, 812th Ammunition Train, and Pvt. Otto Kano, Co. C, 117th Supply Train.

            Private James Riddle, Company E, 305th Infantry. Identification No. 1,681,647. Last heard from in Base Hospital No. 85, last October. Inquiry from cousin, Mrs. Mary G Webster, 241 Park Ave., West Springfield, Mass.

            Pvt. Edward A. Smith, Co. E, 315th infantry, 79th Division, what is reported wounded and in a hospital on September 29. No definite word has come to his mother, Mrs. Smith. 1229 Shackamaxon St., Philadelphia, PA, who has been told by her neighbor that her son was killed.

            Ambrose McIver, formerly of the 18th infantry, Co. C. Last heard from in August, when his address was C. O. D. S. O. S. A. P. O. 726 Blois. Information sought by his sister, Miss Catherine McIver, 2573 8th Ave., New York City.

            Pvt. William F. Heald, American Ambulance Replacement Division, Medical Co. 3, No word has come except the postal announcing his safe arrival in England and the card of welcome from the King of England, signed by Pvt. Heald. His anxious mother seeks information concerning his present address. Write to Mrs. James Heald, Chalfront, PA.

            Pvt. George Smith, Co. M, 109th infantry, was reported missing July 15, 1918. His sister, Elizabeth Smith, 1846 N. 23rd St., Philadelphia, PA, inquires for information concerning him.

            Sgt. Harry B. Schmidt, Co. B, 109th Machine Gun Battalion. Any one who knew Sergeant Schmidt is requested to write his sister, Mrs. H Hartman, 1046 Pacific St., Philadelphia, PA.

            Sgt. John Franklin Burt, Co. D, 311th infantry, was reported missing in action on September 26. Information concerning him is sought by his mother, Mrs. Lillie Burt, 27 Whittier Street, Rahway, N. J.

            Sgt. Romeyn Smack, Co. F, 114th Infantry, reported missing in action October 12. No news from him since September 5, 1918. Information desired by his mother, Mrs. May Smack, 16 Clifford St., East Orange, N. J.

            Pvt. George Drew, 164 U. S. G. Last known address A. G. S. C. Amer. Exp., France, A. P. O. 714. Present whereabouts desired by his uncle, Mr. Alexander Ross, 44 19th Ave., Newark, NJ

            Sgt. John Dillon, Quartermaster Dept., A. P. O. 708 France. Information desired by his sister, Mrs. Frank Reed, 250 Buchanan Ave., Trenton, NJ

            Pvt. Cyril A. Newman. Last Address Convois Automobiles par B. C. M., S. S. U. 592, Paris, France. He has not been heard from since the armistice was signed. Communicate with Mrs. Verna E Newman, 1276 South Broad Street, Trenton, New Jersey.

            Corp. Wallet C. Sanford, Co. C, 9th Infantry, reported killed in action July 18, 1918. Information as requested by Mr. Frank P Hall, 238 Bank St., Morrisville, Pennsylvania, for Corpl Sanford's mother.

            Private Willie Schriver, Company G, 128th infantry. Reported October 24, missing in action. Inquiry from mother, Mrs. William Schriver, Kendall, Wis.

            Pvt. Henry E. Eberle, Co. F, 307th Ammunition Train, reported wounded October 8, 1918. No further word has been received to say whether he recovered or not. Information is eagerly sought by his cousin, Mrs. Mary A. Eberle, 2063 East Dauphin Street, Philidelphia PA

            Pvt. First Class, John Burkes, Co. G, 26th Infantry. Was reported missing in action July 18, 1918. Communicate any information to his sister, Anna Smith, 37 Homestead Ave.,

R. F. D. No. 1, Trenton, N. J.

            Corp. Edwin E. Ferguson, Company E, 113th Infantry. Reported severely wounded September 27, 1918. Inquiry from sister, della Ferguson, Phillipston, PA

            Private Uldrick Moen, Company ?? 139th Infantry. Reported missing in action September 27, 1918. Inquiry from father, Andrew U. Moen, Shawnee, N. D.

            John H. Keesling, Company A, 162d Infantry. Identification No. 1,563,907. Reported missing in action July 20, 1918. Angry from father John H Keesling, Castleton, Ind. Box 33.

            Pvt. Arch L. Greggs, Co. F, 125th Infantry, 32nd Division, has been reported killed and later severely wounded. Was reported to be in Base Hospital No. 18 in November last. Information Elise sought by his family. Write  to Miss Ruth Greggs, 2006 Edna Avenue, Scranton, PA.

            Corp. Thomas H Lewis, Co. M, 109th Infantry, reported missing in the battle of the Marne, July 15, 1918. Further information is desired by his brother, John E. Lewis, 2819 Stiles Street, Philadelphia, PA.

 

 

Campaign To Recruit Regulars Begun Here With 250 Already In

            Recruiting for the regular Army has become one of the popular spring occupations here. The sentiment is growing steadily that Uncle Sam’s one and three year enlistment propositions might be worth in a time when jobs are as scarce as June bugs in January and living flying so high that it has practically no visibility to the naked eye. Yesterday, a recruiting campaign was inaugurated throughout the camp. The advantages offered will be brought to the attention of every man— The fact that vocational instruction is offered a man free, affording a chance to become an expert in, for example, call mobile driving and repairing; that a 30-day furlough is given immediately after enlistment, and that an opportunity is afforded to see France and Germany. Not all enlistments are for overseas service, but a man may specify whether he wishes service at home or with the A. E. F. In each battalion of the Depot Brigade, an assistant recruiting officer will assist Captain A. E. Schobeck, Camp recruiting officer, during the campaign. All the camp organizations—the utilities, Base Hospital, 42nd Infantry, remount depot, and provost guard will be thoroughly combed for perspective regulars. The Motor Transport Corps has shown a remarkable enthusiasm and every man is personally assisting Captain Schobeck in bringing the regular army proposition before Upton’s citizens, permanent and transient.

            Many of the enlistments thus far have been of overseas men. Two hundred and fifty men altogether have signed up for the one or three-year period. Of this number, twenty-five compose an overseas detachment which will be part of the 50,000 volunteer replacements for that service. Then enlistments are for all branches of the service—infantry, cavalry, field artillery, engineers and medical corps. The same rank is retained by a man when he is reassigned to his old outfit.

            Branch recruiting offices are being established in ten of the towns around Camp Upton and special efforts will be made to recruit two thousand men for the 42nd infantry. Only ten men of the 27th division re-enlisted for the regular army.

 

HENCE TRENCH AND CAMP!

            This is Corp. Franklin Penrhyn Cragin. Penrhyn as a middle a middle name was given without charge by the fellow-staffers of Trench and Camp who, in caucus, decided it was artistic and ought to belong to some member of the Family. Corp. Cragin draws well, like the patented pipes they sell at the Post Exchange (advt.). He draws funny stuff. When he isn't drawing, he is playing the African ukulele. That is when his colleagues like him best. Not that his drawings aren't appreciated, especially the watercolor ones showing a Peloponnesian water girl on her way to bring home the daily ration of Aqua Pura from the village well. The Corp’s what are your girls are all clothed in advanced summer styles. They are on free exhibition in the Trench and Camp office.

            And if anyone errantly drops into that Local Louvre, where every fine art is given a chance, the Corp. who draws water girls will tune up his African uke and sing things about not having any money and that's where his money goes which isn't much as he's only a Corp. This Asst. Art Ed also “parleys” in the French tongue. He can say “How comes it ce matin” and “Qu-avez-vous in the way of tabac?”

            NEXT WEEK: The Journalistic Field Clerk, Louis Kellogg, who smokes cigars and wears leather leggings.

 

 

 

 

MORE FIELD CLERKS

            Further appointments of Army Field Clerks for duty in the Personnel Office were announced recently. They are Sergeant Ewald Rosene, Pvts, 1c Merle Berry and Arthur Dahlke.

            Mr. Frank Roehrig, who was formerly supply sergeant of the 28th Co. in the Depot Brigade, is now in the discharge section. While a new member of the Office force, Mr. Roehrig has been in Camp since last spring.

            Q. M. Sergeant Major Martin Lucey, who works in the U. S. Employment Office, is enjoying a furlough in his home town, Bridgeport, Conn.

            Mr. Porte, of the Distribution Section, is back again in the office, after being confined in the Base Hospital for several weeks.

 

 

 

OLD BANDMASTER LEAVES

            Lieut. Albert W. Eckenroth, band master of the 152nd Depot Brigade band of this Camp received his discharge from the service last week. For the past few months, Lieut. Eckenroth, with his band, has been stationed at Hoboken, N. J., where they have played for Overseas troops as they arrived at this port.

            Lieut. Eckenroth, has returned to his former position as leader and director of the band of John Wanamaker’s store at Philadelphia, PA.

 

 

 

One Year Today 77th Division Warned The Hun

 

            Here are a few excerpts from the issue of Trench and Camp one year ago today. Write your own story.

            “The dedication of the colors of the 305th infantry (77th division) in the Y. M. C. A. auditorium recently brought an address from Major General Bell which stirred the officers and men of the regiment to five minutes of enthusiastic cheering. The appearance of the veteran camp commander who has just returned from France was the occasion for innovation shared by Colonel W. R. Smedberg, jr., commanding officer of the ‘peppy Three-O-Fifth.’”

            And in the same issue of Trench and Camp is a significant illustration. The division had just begun to leave for France and a soldier – illustrator pictured the Now-ex Kaiser staring apprehensively at the “hand-writing on the wall.” The handwriting reads as follows:

THE METROPOLITAN DIVISION TO PRUSSIANISM DIABOLICAL

For every helpless, murdered babe,

            For all the womanhood you've wrecked,

For all your U-boats’ coward stabs,

            For all the lies you've foully spawned,

For all the faith you've set at naught,

            For every hissing serpent of deceit,

For making human right a thing of scorn,

            For blasphemies against all sacred things,

For brothers who have died because you live,

            For our own precious mothers, sisters, babes;

For everything that means sunshine and light to us and those that follow after us—

 

WE  COME

                           WE  COME

                                                       WE  COME

            All available data on the performance of the 77th division which one year ago was silently marching from camp in the night, regiment after regiment, indicates that the foregoing morning was more than made good.

 

 

 

 

Big Corporation Reinstating Employees Who Served Nation

 

            Here's the way one of the largest of the country's corporations is greeting it's returning soldier – employees:

                                    “TO EMPLOYEES RETURNING FROM MILITARY SERVICE”

            “Men having been given leave of absence for military service who have been honorably discharged therefrom, and who desire to again take up work in the Company should make application within thirty days after they are mustered out.

            “If it is not possible to assign them to work immediately, they will be placed on a preferred list until such time as business conditions enable us to take them on.  During their continuance on the preferred list, they will enjoy the same rights with respect to the Employees’ Benefit Plan as they had while in the service of the United States, and they may take other employment.

            “When they are notified of a vacancy they should present themselves for work at the time started, and failing to present themselves for ten days thereafter, their leave of absence shall terminate.

                                                                        “WESTERN ELECTRIC COMPANY, Incorporated.”

 

 

 

 

As Liquor, This Camp Beverage Is Tres Near

            Any day in the main Camp Exchange at Fourth Avenue and Upton Boulevard you can see the barkeep—beg pardon, the dispenser of liquid refreshment—drawing tall ones and scraping the foam off with that indispensable ivory utensil that will become nearly obsolete after July 1st. It tastes just like beer, smells like beer, has the same creamy froth as beer, and has almost the same cooling and thirst-quenching properties. It even contains alcohol. But alas, it isn't beer. It doesn't—well, it doesn't produce that roseateness the genuine article has on tap. You could drink a barrel of it and not get lit.

            This new drink has become very popular in Camp Upton. Which is admitted to be a dry and dusty place even by its staunchest admirers. Every day or evening the men stand in front of the miniature bar which has been installed and with one foot up on an empty box against the counter, they endeavor to imagine they are in Joe’s or Jack’s or Charlie’s.

            Certain connoisseurs of beers who were interviewed after partaking of the new drink, say that it is a first class substitute.

            “It's as near as the law allows,” said a certain particularly well recognized expert in intoxicants. “You might say it was near but not quite close enough. On a close day it would seem very near. One glass and a vivid imagination is enough to make any man, if his imagination is vivid enough, think he is going to get spiffed.”

            Lest anyone is curious to know the constituents of the new liquid that Camp Upton is now drinking, the formula is as follows:

Specific gravity………………………………….1.0241

   1.  Alcohol—

             0.29%  by weight

             0.365% by volume

   2.  Apparent extract specific gravity………..1.0241

   3.  Real extract specific gravity……………..1.0245

   4.  Ash (total)  0.07745  gr.  In  100 gr.

   5.  Of which 0.0213  gr.  in. 100 gr. is phosphoric acid

   6.  Protein   (N x 6.25) 0.1568 gr. in   100 gr.

   7.  Acidity  (as lactic acid) 0.0675  gr. in 100 gr.

   8.  Reducing sugars 2.546 gr. in 100 gr.

   9.  Dextrin 2.618 gr. in 100 gr.

  10. Carbonic acid 0.48 gr. in 100 gr.

 

            So there you are! If beer is any fermented liquor that has not undergone distillation, and that's just what it is, then this isn't beer, but it's the best that Camp Upton can do. Anyway, it's just as good as the temperance drink George M. Cohen sells in the later reels of “Hit the Trail Holliday.” So set ‘em up again!

 

 

Busy Camp Ambulance Company Hauls 1200 Patients A Week

            The motor ambulances that are seen occasionally on the Camp streets make a total of 300 calls and transport an average of 1,200 patients a week. Yet the very efficient ambulance company is one of the least known institutions in Camp.

            Officially the company, which has its barracks, garage and repair shop at Second Avenue and Eighth Street, is known as Provisional Ambulance Company No. 61. It took over the ambulance work when Motor Ambulance Company No. 61 went overseas November 8, 1918.

            Nineteen ambulances are used by the company, which comprises 120 men. Lt. E. Martin Dings commands the outfit, assisted by Lt. C. G. Farrell. Hugh A. Flood is the first sergeant and acting Sgt. Joseph H. Teal has direct supervision over the assignment of ambulances and drivers.

            The principal work of the company is to transport patients from camp infirmaries and barracks to the Base Hospital and bring men back from the Hospital and to meet hospital trains and all other incoming troop trains.

            One hospital train a week on the average comes to Camp Upton, carrying from 70 to 120 patients.

            When the Twenty-seventh Division was in Camp, the company was particularly busy but the number of calls it has to make remains very largely the same from week to week. Eight men are on duty from seven to four every day; four from four to ten in the evening and one during the night. The whole force, of course, can be called out in an emergency. Five mechanics keep the cars in repair and tuned up.

            The company does a great deal, too, in the way of transporting convalescent patients to and from Patchogue, Riverhead and Yaphank.

 

 

DEMOBILIZERS GET BIG REST AFTER 27th WORK

            There was a change of executive officers in the Demobilization Section of the Camp Personnel Office, at 411 10th Street, last week. Captain Edgar R. Perry, A. G. D., Who has been the commanding officer of the Demobilization Section for the last six weeks, left camp on a 15 days’ leave, prior to discharge, and was succeeded by Captain Ernest H. Alberty, A.G.D.

            Captain Perry came to Upton from Camp Lewis, Wash.

            Captain Perry’s successor, Captain Alberty, came to this camp from Fort Sam Houston, Texas, in the Southern Department. He has had a long experience in the military service.

            Coincident with the department of Captain Perry, the captain's assistant, Lieutenant Willis H. Hoyt, was discharged from the service. The tenant who was discharged from the service. Lieut. Hoyt is a scientific farm manager and plans to take up that occupation. His place was taken temporarily by Lieutenant Walter H Newton, of the 3rd Company, 152nd Depot Brigade, Who was liaison officer for Captain Perry keeping the captains office In touch with the five demobilization districts of the camp, during the mustering out of the 27th division. Lieutenant Newton remained on special duty as Captain Alberty’s assistant until the arrival Lieut. Hoyt’s permanent successor, Lieutenant Edward a Finnegan, who came to this camp from Camp Gordon, GA., where he had been stationed for several months.

            The first weekend after the demobilization of the 27th Division was a weekend of unrestricted rest for the boys of the Demobilization Section, who handled all the records of that division and were worked night and day for seven days. It was so arranged that the moment the work began to lighten every man in the section got a day or two off and a pass to visit the city.

            A small quota was allowed to go on pass on the preceding Thursday, reporting back on Saturday morning, to man the office over the weekend, while all the others were given passes or leaves over Saturday and Sunday. The weekend was in sharp contrast to the previous one, when the Demobilization Section was humming like a beehive. The insignia of the 27th Division was continually to be met in office and corridors, and the records of that division were piled high on the tables in the checking and shipping rooms.

            The 27th was eager to be mustered out; but it's a cinch they weren't any more eager than the Demobilization Section was to get ‘me mustered out, for with the departure of the last unit, the 102nd Field Signal Battalion, there was a welcome break in the ultra— strenuous days of toil – and nights, too!

            A Liaison System for distribution of orders and correspondence to the various organizations throughout the Camp was recently established in the Personnel Office. In connection with the system routes have been established which are covered by orderlies with the aid of motorcycles, who are sent out almost every hour of the day and evening. Field Clerk Arthur J. Meeks is in charge of the men distributing the orders.

Holy Week Services In The Camp Chapel

            Special Holy Week are being held every day in Camp Chapel. They will be concluded with the Easter Sunday services, at which appropriate musical programs will be given.

            The observance of Holy Week began on Palm Sunday when Chaplain Fell preached at the 10:30 service and Chaplain Hettrick in the evening. Yesterday evening Chaplin McGiffin conducted the services. This evening, at 7:30, Secretary Witter, of the YMCA, will speak. Secretary Welsh will officiate tomorrow night; Secretary Beatty, Friday; Secretary Traub, Saturday.

            A communion service is being held every morning at 8 o'clock by Chaplain Fell. Men of all Christian persuasions are invited to attend.

            There will be a three-hour devotion on Friday from 12 to 3 in the afternoon, conducted by the Chaplain Fell. On Easter Sunday Holy Communion will be at 10:30 A.M. Captains Hetrick and McRea will officiate. Secretary Loud will make an address in the evening at 7:30. Special Easter music will be a feature of the services.

            The exercises throughout are of a union character and men of all denominations are welcome.

 

 

Father Of Three Fighting a Sons Wounded Patient In Base Here

            One of the wounded in the base hospital here who is undoubtedly in a class by himself is Sergeant Thos. W. Cohill, father of three sons now in France. The sire and the three fighting members of his family all had a hand in war – making. Daddy Cohill was the only one wounded, however. He was with Company A, 305th infantry, 77th division. When war broke out in April, he couldn't stay quietly in the states, having served in the Spanish American in the Sixth U. S. Infantry, so in listed in the 58th infantry. Later he was transferred to the 305th. His sons are John, Canadian Royal engineers, Andrew, 15th U.S. engineers and king, fourth U.S. infantry. King in a recent letter addresses his father, “My dear Buddie,” and says:

            “I can't tell you how glad I was to receive a letter from you yesterday but was sorry to learn that you were still laid up in the hospital with your leg. I hope it will get well in a hurry, as I know how well you like to stay in the hospital especially after you have return to the states. This is a real camp here. You may have gone through the classification section here at La Mans after being released from the hospital the first time.

            “Everything is work around here. There are over seven thousand men working here day and night. The 77th this division is around here and will leave for the states in a few weeks. No doubt they will get a big hand when they pull off their parade in New York. You'll have to get in the parade as that's your outfit. I believe, father, that you beat me to it in the way of experiences but we both got a hand in the big fuss and will fight the whole war over again as soon as I see you. I am might glad that you pulled through it well as you did. I'm a little younger than you and it wouldn't have mattered much if I had got banged up.”

 

HOLDING THE CAMP SPORT PIVOT

                               By G. A. P.

            The two greatest heroes of the Battle of Camp Upton have returned to the old battlefield. They are Lt. Bart Carroll, old Colgate star center, tackle and end, and Lt. Ellsworth McMullen, who starred at Bates College. These men were injured in the closing game of the last football season, when Upton put up such A great fight against Camp Dix at Newark, New Jersey, finishing with a tie score of 7-7.

            McMullen was injured in the second quarter, his leg being broken between the knee and the ankle. McMullen went out in the last quarter with a broken ankle, after playing a few minutes in spite of his injury. Both men were taken to the Newark City Hospital, thence to the military hospital in Hoboken, where they have been cultivating the acquaintance of the reconstruction aides during the past eighteen weeks.

 

                                                      ————————————

            Leon Cadore, Upton rookie, who rose from the ranks to a commission, and served with the A.E.F., is back pitching for the Brooklyn Club. The Robins, so Charley Ebbetts, Jr., promises, will play their opener at Ebbets field May 1st,  and there will be a big delegation of old Uptonians where in the hope of seeing their old favorite on the mound. The Brooklyn Club has done a lot for a baseball at Upton, and has attracted many staunch friends by its generosity.

 

                                                      ————————————

            Captain Booth, until recently camp athletic officer, has returned to the practice of law in New York. He contacted a few cases in the New York courts, and visit Upton in civilian attire. A few of his friends recognized him, and the other is explained that an old officer who sits in “cits” in the officers club should wear a label.

 

                                                      ————————————

            Captain Wade, Recreation Director of the Red Cross, at the Base Hospital, has returned to New York City, after a few months of strenuous work, during which he made a great impression on the boys at the Base.

 

                                                      ————————————

            Benny Leonard, Upton boxing instructor, and the man who taught the 77th Division the noble art, will box at Newark next week against Willie Ritchie, The man who won the verdict over the champ in a four-round bout out west. The coming bout will probably be for eight rounds, and Benny's admirers and friends at Upton are counting on him to win the verdict.

 

Liaison Officer Battle Veteran

            Lieut. Colonel William H. Kennedy, who succeeds Major Thomas F. Maginnis as Port Liaison Officer at Camp Upton, has seen long and active military service.

            He has just returned from abroad where he commanded the Third Battalion, 106th Field Artillery, in support of the Eighteenth French Division and the Thirty-third and Seventy-ninth American Divisions. He participated in the battles of St. Mihiel, Sept. 12, 1918; Forges Brook Sept. 26, 1918; Meuse-Argonne, Sept. 27 to Oct. 2, 1918; Brieulles, Oct. 3rd to 7th, 1918; Bois de Chaume, Bois Plat Chene and Comsenvoye, Oct. 8th to 13th, 1918; Grande Montagne, Oct. 14th, 1918; Vilosnes, Sivry, October 15-21st, 1918; Meuse-Argonne, Oct. 29th to November 2, 1918; Dun-sur-Meuse, November 3, 1918; Haraumont Ridge and Borne du Cornouiller, Nov. 4-7, 1918; Reville, Etraye, Crepion, November 8, 1918; Cotes du Romagne, du Morimont, du Chateau, Nov. 9-11, 1918. Colonel Kennedy was with the A.E.F. Form June 6, 1918, until March 13 last.

            prior to the great war, he took part in the campaigns in Cavite and Batangas Provinces, Luzon, P. I., January to Aug. 1905, and in the Cuban Pacification, Sept., 1906 to January, 1907; in the battles of Siet Lake, Taglibi, Mount Urut, Mount Bud Bajo, Tambang Market, Jolo, Jolo, P. I., 1911, and in Mexican Border Patrol, 1912 and 1913, 1916-1917.

            Colonel Kennedy joined the army as a private in the Second Wisconsin infantry in 1898. Subsequently he held many non-commissioned ranks, as well as serving four years in the Navy. He became captain of the Tenth Connecticut F. A. Yale Batteries, in 1916; major of the 106th F. A. in 1917 and Lieutenant Colonel last February.

 

 

Dumbells Meet Scrubs In A Twilight Game

            The Dumbells and the Scrubs met in the first Twilight Game at the new Base Hospital diamond.  Each side collected five hits in the five innings, but the dumbbells got the most runs on the number of men walk to first. Merkle was a trifle wild in the first two innings, but got better control toward the end of the game. The feature of the game was a double-play. FitzMaurice to Ferguson to Beaty. Summary:

                                                      Dumbells

                                                                        AB     R      H     Po    A

Ferguson, 1b…………………………………..…2       2       1      6     1

Carroll, ss…………………………………………2       2       1      0     1

Bickford, 3b…………………………………..….3        1       1      1     1

Beaty, 2b………………………………………….3       0       0      2     0

Dolman, 1f………………………………………..3       0        1     0     0

Capus, cf…………………………………………1        2       1      0     1

Duff, rf…………………………………………….2        1       0      0     0

Hornstein, c………………………………………1        0       0      3     1

FitzMaurice, p……………………………………1        0       0      1     4

                                                                         —      —     —     —   —

                     Totals………………………………18      8       5     13    9

                                                      Scrubs

                                                                         AB      R      H     Po  A

Madden, cf………………………………………..2        2       1      0    0

Sharon, 1b………………………………………..2         0       0      4    0

Riff, 1f……………………………………………..3         1       1      0    0

Coyne, ss………………………………………….3        0       1      0    0

Harding, 2b……………………………………….3         0       1      2    1

Isaacs, 3b…………………………………………3         0       0      0    1

Skidmore, rf……………………………………….3        1        0      0    0

Weinstein, c……………………………………….2        1        1      9    1

Merkle, p…………………………………………..0        0        1      0    3

                                                                          —      —       —    —   —

                     Totals……………………………….21      6         5    15    6

            Two Base hits, Ferguson, Riff. Errors, Carroll 2. Stolen base, Coyne. Left on bases, Dumbells 2, Scrubs 2. Struck out, by FitzMaurice 4, by Merkle 7. Base on balls, off FitzMaurice 3, off Merkle 7. Hit by pitched ball, off FitzMaurice 1. Umpire, Lt. Wray.

 

LT. LARRY SCUDDER WILL HANDLE BASEBALL

            Lt. Larry Scudder, well-known Upton track star,  Who had a great athletic career at the U of Penn., Is taking a hold of the baseball team that will represent Camp Upton during the coming season. Lt. Scudder is a capable player and manager, and any man who shows that he has the goods will get a chance on the big team.

            All semi-pro, College and good amateur ball players should report to Lt. Larry Scudder, at the Dental Hospital, Upton Boulevard, between Third and Fourth Avenues.

 

MEETS OLD OPPONENT

            “Red” Allen, welterweight, who boxed at the Red Cross recently, met in one of the patients and old opponent, Will Adams, of Toronto, Canada, who went overseas with the 106th, the old 71st, of Brooklyn, was wounded in the legs, arms and shoulders while on the Hindenburg Line.

            “Red” and Adams 415 rounds to a draw in Toronto three years ago, and this is the first time they have met since the battle. They had a very interesting chat together, and Will Adams only regretted the fact that his wounds would not allow him to box for the entertainment of the boys.

 

NONDESCRIPTS FALL

            The challenge issued by J- 8 nine at the Base Hospital was excepted by the Nondescripts, who were unfortunate to lose through a break in the fourth which the J-8 veterans Took full advantage of winning by one run, scoring four runs with four bunched hits, while the Nondescripts only notched three runs with six scattered hits. Score:

                                                      J-8

                                                                                     AB    R       H

Riff, c………………………………………………………..3      0       1

Scherman, 2b………………………………………………2      1       0

Harding, 1b…………………………………………………3      1       2

Mahnken, 1f………………………………………………..2       1       1

Bohen, 3b…………………………………………………..2       1       0

Brakeman, rf………………………………………………..2       0       0

Boskey, ss…………………………………………………..2       0       0

Gallagher, p…………………………………………………2       0       0

Merkle, cf……………………………………………………2       0       0

                                                                                       —     —      —

                                                                                       20     4        4

                                          Nondescripts

                                                                                       AB    R       H

Comosh, J., ss……………………………………………. 2       1        2

Hamje, 1b…………………………………………………..3        0       1

Schenk, 2b………………………………………………….3       0       1

Ferguson, p…………………………………………………2       1       0

Comosh, G., lf………………………………………………3       0       1

Berger, cf……………………………………………………2        1       1

Paolina, rf……………………………………………………2       0       0

Hornstein, c…………………………………………………2        0      0

Bickford, 3b…………………………………………………2        0      0

 

            Two Base hit Comosh. Left on bases, Nondescripts 2, J-B 1. Stolen bases, Comosh, Berger, Paolina, Hornstein, Scheran. Struck out, by Ferguson 5, by Gallagher 3. Base on balls, off Ferguson 2, off Gallagher 2. Hit by pitched ball, off Ferguson 1. Umpire, Lt. Wray.

 

DENTISTS IN GOOD FORM

            Baseballists of Camp Dental Infirmary displayed mid-season form in a five inning game with the Ninth Co. recently on the Old Sixth Battalion drill grounds. “Dick” Fritz, pitching for the infirmary nine, showed exceptional control and used a lot of headwork. “Goopy” Lynch was the heavy slugger, making a triple and a homer, the latter, with the bases choked, being mainly responsible for the rather one-sided score of 12 to 3, a bitter pill for the Ninth Co. nine to swallow. The infirmary nine would like to arrange games with any camp organization, and all communications should be addressed to Pvt. C. A. Hellquist at the Camp Dental Infirmary.

 

RED CROSS IMPORTS SOME NEW YORK PUGS

            The Red Cross has staged some great bouts at the Base Hospital during the past week. The big night was Saturday, when Billy Oates, of New York City brought down a number of boxers who put up a great exhibition. The star bout of the evening was between Jack Robinson, old-time welterweight, and Steamboat Jackson, of Panama. Robinson got the decision.


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